Video: Designing a Wedding Arch

Video: Designing a Wedding Arch

In this video, Kelly of Team Flower demonstrates how to create a new shape when designing an arbor. Pay attention to how she widens an arbor with various mechanics and design tips. Ingredients used are Honeysuckle, Burning Bush, Rhododendron, Lilac, Scillia, Foxglove, Wild Geranium, Ferns, Wisteria, and Moss.

 Heather Payne Photography

Heather Payne Photography

Key Points

  • Lined garden boxes can be used as a water source for ground flowers that can add some size and ground reach to the height of an arbor setup if you're going for a more lush, full, garden-style effect.
  • In much the same way as when you build a centerpiece, paying attention to balance as you install the first layer of greenery on an arch is key to how the whole aesthetic presents once it is finished.
  • For 4 o'clock and 5 o'clock outdoor weddings, it can be a good idea to make your bride aware of the fact that doing an arbor install in the heat of the day before an event might mean that the flowers get a little droopy and the foliage looks a little thirsty! Things often perk back up as the evening comes on, but it's good let your client know that temperature control outdoors is tough, and hot sun during install is a factor in how happy your arbor will look once complete.
  • If you are working within budget constraints and don't have a lot of luxe blooms to go around, concentrate on making one area a little extra special, perhaps with a few finishing flower touches that you don't use elsewhere, to elevate the whole and make a little go a long way.
  • Sheet moss is a great way to cover Oasis mechanics that are showing so that you don't have to use more flowers or foliage; that keeps things airy, and allows you the freedom to use your main materials where they have the best impact.

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