All tagged Tutorial

Video: Make a Simple, Elegant Floral Design with just 2 Ingredients

Watch as Kelly puts together a simple two ingredient arrangement. Poppies and Solomon's Seal are a sweet late-spring pair. This design is perfect for dressing up a windowsill at home, wedding bar or guestbook table on the fly!   

Transcript

Hey, I'm back, excited to share an arrangement with you that this time only has two ingredients. I have Solomon's seal and poppies. I also have a message for you on the upper side of my camera. And it is that you are awesome. OK, have a flower frog in my container. This is also [INAUDIBLE] decor, if you're looking for one. Have my pieces of Solomon's seal are arranged by size. I have one that's long, and then two that are more of a smaller/medium size. 

Gonna start with this one. We're going to go straight up. Going to be fun. And I'm going to clip it down just a little bit. Got a frog in here that's raising my levels. Whenever you're not using a lot of flowers, mention frogs are great, because they're just kind of pretty to look at. I think they look nice in an arrangement. 

So I have to be as conscious about covering-- kind of the point is to show negative space in the arrangement. We're using the principle of design of radiation in this arrangement. Everything is going to-- all the lines are going to come out from one point with this base material that we're working with. 

And for balance, I'm wanting to keep this as my center point, and then same amount both to the right and left. And what I'm doing with these pieces, I'm kind of moving around in this circle a bit, and I'm creating a little house for the poppies to live, making room for them. 

So this is where we are. This is the front side of the arrangement, and my poppies are going to live in this area here. So we created the general shape, the general size, that goal of level one. We're not going to worry about covering the base. And this sort of is just another part of that. And then we're going to use the poppies as both level two and level three. We're going to have them work together to create a resting point for the eye. But then we're also going to use them to create movement through line. 

Now, a lot of the times I like to use gradation in size whenever I'm arranging, but my smallest poppy has the shortest stem, so we're going to reverse that. This is probably technically-- let's see here. One third, it looks a little bit-- yeah, the poppy is a little bit too high proportion wise. So I'm going to let him come down a little bit. 

I was reading somewhere that poppies like to drink through the little hairs on their stems. So getting them this way, you singe the ends to seal off that little wound, and then put them in deep water till they're properly hydrated as these ones are. 

OK, so those are going to be my bottom two. With poppies, too, I think they're really pretty if you could just have their faces pointing in different ways as you work. They're all looking straight at you, staring you down, making you feel a little bit uncomfortable. Poppy etiquette. 

So this is something that would be fantastic for a guest book table or bars, anywhere to add a little extra thing, only 10 stems, 10 stems, two ingredients. Big, the whole way down to small. We're doing this kind of trickle, faces up, faces out, moving in and out throughout the arrangement. OK. Be back with another one for you. 

7 Easy Steps to Creating a Foam-Free Living Meadow

With an ever-increasing installation trend in weddings and event work, as well as the emphasis on foam-free floral designs, I was eager to figure out a way to create a ground installation, or living meadow, with foam-free mechanics that offered flexibility in multiple installation scenarios. There are so many options for foam-free installation mechanics out there, but this is the method that worked well for me. Hopefully, you will find it useful—or maybe it will provide you with a starting point for additional foam-free floral designs!

How to Make a Large Paper Flower

Paper flowers are making a statement in the floral industry. Not only do they never wilt, but they can also be made to look like a real bloom! Perhaps you’re hesitant to use paper flowers because it’s unfamiliar territory. Maybe you could try making one yourself! Here are a few simple instructions on how you can make a large paper flower for your next event.

Video: How to Create a Small Floral Centerpiece Featuring Spirea Foliage

In this video lesson, we’ll learn how to observe for inspiration while adjusting the arrangement layers for a smaller centerpiece. A lot of Centerpieces & Reception students have asked how to adapt to a smaller arrangement, so here Kelly shows you how! Ingredients used are Spirea Foliage, Gold's Dart Ninebark, Diablo Ninebark, Polka Dot Pippa Hybrid, Ranunculus, La Belle Epoch Tulips, Coral Bell Foliage, and Geum.

In-Depth Techniques You Need for Growing Delphinium

Growing delphinium as a cut flower crop can have its challenges, but if you follow an orderly process, it can be a very rewarding flower to grow. Delphinium has several advantages such as its striking, dramatic quality and large stature which can be useful in larger arrangements. It also blooms during that early June window when your spring flowers may be finished, but your summer annuals aren’t flowering yet, helping you fill in that gap. It also provides that hard-to-find true blue color in both light and dark shades.

How to Design Jewelry Using Fresh Flowers

We’ve all seen the trend of flower crowns, flower jewelry, and flower accessories bloom into the market. And for good reason, too. How cool is it to accessorize your look with fresh floral creations? Floral accessories are great for bridesmaids to accessorize or perhaps for that untraditional bride looking for a little wow-factor. Mothers love a bracelet cuff adorned with floral rather than a traditional wrist corsage! But how do we design jewelry using fresh flowers?

Video: How to Make a Chuppah

Our friend Fuschia of Fuschia Moss Floral Design is here to help show us how to make a chuppah. See how we used a bale of southern smilax and late summer forsythia foliage to create a base and a very small amount of oasis and chicken wire to provide support and nourishment for the flowers.

Video: How to Make a Cradle Bouquet (AKA a Pageant Bouquet)

The cradle bouquet (also known as the pageant bouquet) is often overlooked by designers. This bouquet shape is perfect for gracefully draping over one arm. It is similar to a cascade, but it moves out and away from the body rather than in front. It's pleasant and easy to hold, surprisingly lightweight, and perfect for a bride who likes to keep her flowers close.

Video: Entry Table Floral Arrangement How-To

In this video, Kelly uses one of her favorite planters from TJ Maxx with a liner for a fresh-flower arrangement. The key ingredients are Viburnum, Mock Orange, and Poppies. You'll learn about the undertone colors in flowers and how attention to this can bring unity to your ingredient choices. As you watch, notice that each of the flowers are of a creamy white color palette. However, they also bring in a yellow hint in the center of the flowers, especially the poppy and mock orange.

How to Make a Wreath (It’s Easier Than You Think)

Team Flower member Deanna Kitchen shares a comprehensive step-by-step guide on making a wreath. Whether you’ve been in floral design or farming for years or are just getting started, wreath-making truly is the quintessential holiday craft to add to your repertoire: the materials are simple and readily available locally, the steps are straightforward, and it’s the perfect project to complete with a group of friends. The accessibility and ease of this project also helps make it a fun family craft too. And honestly, nothing tops the smell of all of those freshly snipped boughs!

How to make a greenery bouquet

This year, I booked a wedding where the bride requested only greenery. I included a few blooms in her bouquet and the groom’s boutonniere, but other than that, there were no flowers. It turned out beautifully! The ingredients I chose were a compilation of items from a local farm, from a local wholesaler, and from my backyard. While it was much more difficult than I thought it would be to narrow down the ingredient list and choose shades of green that told a cohesive story, I enjoyed the challenge and would welcome it again!

Video: Late Summer Bridesmaid Bouquet

In this video you'll hear how Kelly approaches bridesmaid bouquets. Typically, the bridesmaid bouquet is a scaled back, smaller version of the bride’s more intricate bouquet. While often times the bridesmaid bouquet uses many of the same ingredients as the bridal bouquet, there are instances where the bridesmaids only utilize greenery so that the bride’s flowers pop even more. Ultimately, that decision is up to you - the designer!

Fall Wedding Bouquet Recipe

My favorite bouquets always start with a walk in the woods and end at a local flower farm.  It’s there that I find ingredients that are not only unique and special like my brides, but these ingredients speak to the present moment.  I think that’s really special.  Here is a behind-the-scenes look at what goes into a bridal bouquet and the ingredients it calls for.  I hope it inspires you as you plan your wedding!

Video: Centerpiece Using Few Ingredients

In this video, Kelly uses only a few ingredients to create a beautiful centerpiece. Baptesia takes color to the arrangement edges and Lady's Mantle gives us low coverage. Iris is on double duty, creating an implied line offering a grouping of color to provide some rest in the arrangement.